• Age of kits

    • In most areas of the United States it is illegal to purchase a kit under 8 weeks old. Even if it isn’t illegal in your area, it isn’t the best idea – kits are still nursing part time until they reach 8 weeks old. If separated from their mother earlier, this can lead to developmental problems, digestive problems or even death.

  • Housing

    • Ensure that your housing is designed to fit your specific breed and size of rabbit. The guidelines for housing can be found at https://www.arba.net/PDFs/CAW.pdf and adhere to the Animal Welfare Act.

      • In general, 14-16 gauge, welded, galvanized wire is best for rabbits. Avoid hardware cloth as this quickly erodes or is chewed through by the rabbit.

    • If you have other rabbits, quarantine your new rabbit for 30 days to make sure no potential diseases are passed to the rest of your herd.

    • If your rabbit is an indoor rabbit then be sure to have an appropriate indoor cage ready to go with bedding. Avoid cedar and stained wood as these cause respiratory issues in rabbits. Keep food and water in a location free of drafts and direct sun. Ensure that nothing is touching the cage, as rabbits are prone to chewing (especially cords).

    • If your rabbit is an outdoor rabbit then be sure to have an appropriate cage or hutch ready to go with plenty of shelter from sun, wind, and the other elements. Rabbits do well in cooler weather, but not warmer weather (above 70 degrees F). Direct sun can kill a rabbit in a matter of hours, and a wet rabbit risks hypothermia. Be sure nothing is touching the hutch or cage where a rabbit can possibly reach it, as your rabbit is guaranteed to chew anything it can reach or pull through the wire.

      • If you intend to house your rabbit on the ground, be aware that rabbits are diggers and climbers. Make sure to put wire on top of the dirt to avoid escape.